senileWhat’s the connotation that comes with a phrase like senile crocodile? A predatory creature that lurks just under the murky waters waiting for its prey to haplessly come swimming by only to, umm, forget what it was going to do as those pasty white legs come splashing by? Not remembering what it was doing there, the senile crocodile turns around and heads to the beach to sun itself and watch Matlock? Well, if you’re an idiot much like myself that’s what comes to your mind. But if you do something as simple as capitalize those words -Senile Crocodile- what you have there is a crazy rock n’ roll outfit out of Kingston Upon Hull which consists of Jonathon Winn on vocals and guitar, Carl Macklin on drums, and Liam Turnbull on bass. I thought there was someone on “yelps” and “hoots” as well, but they weren’t listed. We’ll just say Davey Edinbroch on yelps and hoots(just go with it).

Senile Crocodile label their noise as both “stoner pop” and “post-pop”, which while cute don’t really mean a damn thing. I don’t think anyone that is anywhere near stoned could make this music. You need all your bits n’ pieces in order and at full attention when making this cacophonous noise. It reminds me more of Detroit in the early 70s than San Francisco in the late 60s, but what do I know I’m stoned. Think of a cross between Blue Cheer, Arctic Monkeys, and the Mothers of Invention, put a twist of amphetamines over that cocktail and you’re getting close. Senile Crocodile play like a band that at any minute could fly off the handle. Set the drums on fire(and maybe the drummer, too) and laugh at the crowd with bloody smiles while lighting a smoke with the blazing skins. “Voyager” is a twisted little garage rock anthem that moves and weaves like a punk rock band that just discovered time changes and The Strokes. “Terms And Conditions” is just batshit crazy. I don’t even know how to describe it. We go from System of a Down stuttering vocals, to a 70s funk cock rock thing in the chorus all in under a minute and a half. Set phasers to “groovy”. “Modem” is a riff rocker about the trials and tribulations of a computer connection. Maybe it’s symbolism, I don’t know. “5 Year Plan” has a wild west feel with the guitar line before the Croc implements some more time changes and talk of walks and discussing, well, 5 year plans.

Here’s the thing, these lads can play. They’ve got the energy, the ideas, and the chuztpah to make a career out of this whole music thing. They show they’ve got writing and playing chops on this four song collection simply titled Senile Crocodile. If I could give some advice, I’d say hone that wild card energy and batshit craziness. Bring it in and condense it. Instead of changing the song three or four times, change it twice. Or not at all and keep one monster groove going. Too many ideas and changes make ears get tired and move on.

But what do I know. Senile or not, this croc has got some bite. Enter the waters in Kingston Upon Hull at your own risk.