The fashion industry is hardly the most lively and imaginative world at the best of times. Whilst it’s often dominated by a stuffy and snobbish clique, it’s always one full of people from privileged backgrounds. Traditionally, Haute couture is not made by or for the poor. In the 1990s a very special designed came along and shattered that bubble. Ian Bonhôte and Peter Ettedgui’s new film McQueen tells the story of the enfant terrible of the British fashion.

The son of a Scottish taxi driver, Lee Alexander McQueen grew up in an ordinary terraced house in Stratford. After an apprenticeship on Saville Row and completing a masters in Fashion Design he fell under the wing of influential stylist Isabella Blow. After being named British fashion designer of the year twice, he became Head Designer at Givenchy before leaving to start a partnership with Gucci. However, fame and fortune came at a high price.

McQueen is a breathtaking and stylish tribute to a man whose desire, dedication and determination led him to become one of the most influential fashion designers in the world. However, he was no stranger to controversy and courting it to get the exposure he needed. Regardless of your interest in fashion (I have none), Bonhôte and Ettedgui have created a beautiful documentary which uses contemporary interviews and archive footage to piece together the story of a remarkable and troubled man.

McQueen is available on Digital Download now and released on Blu-ray and DVD by Lionsgate Home Entertainment on 22 October.