With all the excitement around season 3 of Twin Peaks, along with the recent statement from David Lynch that he will not be making any more films, there’s no better time to re-watch Mulholland Drive. Interestingly, when Mulholland Drive was originally released, the opposite was the case. A frustrated director jumping ship from TV to cinema. It remains his best and most impenetrable film.

Betty (Naomi Watts), a bright-eyed aspiring actress, arrives in LA hoping to realise her dream of becoming a successful actress. When she arrives at her aunt’s house, who’s out of town, Betty finds a mysterious woman in the property. It turns out Rita (Laura Harring), the name she adopts, was in a car crash and has no recollection of her identity. Betty is determined to help her discover who she really is.

Mulholland Drive is one of the most hotly-debated films of all time. It’s still impossible to fathom precisely what it’s about and Lynch seems disinclined to elaborate in any great detail. In the roundabout, it’s a commentary on Hollywood. Initially conceived as a TV pilot, it was filmed in two separate segments over a year apart. It’s as baffling as it is exhilarating. Combining elements of Phycological drama, horror, soap opera and crime mystery, Mulholland Drive is a genre-bending classic which still retains the element of surprise.

Special Features:

• Back to Mulholland Drive featurette
• On the Road to Mulholland Drive featurette
• Criterion interview with Naomi Watts & David Lynch
• New Interview with Laura Elena Harring
• New interview with Mary Sweeney
• Interview with Angelo Badalamenti
• Introduction by Thierry Jousse
• In the Blue Box Featurette
• EPK Interviews: David Lynch, Naomi Watts, Justin Theroux, Laura Elena Harring
• Deleted Scene

The digitally restored Mulholland Drive is released on Blu-ray, DVD and EST by StudioCanal on Monday 22 May.