When it comes to famous Scottish historical figures, there’s very few, if any, more famous than Robert the Bruce. He spent much of his adult life battling the English and serving under William Wallace, eventually succeeding the ‘braveheart’ as joint Guardian of Scotland. Bruce was crowned King of Scotland in 1306. However, after a number of defeats to King Edward I’s armies he found himself on the run; abandoned, hunted and a wanted man. This is where Richard Gray’s new film, Robert the Bruce, picks up.

After a string of defeats at the hands of the English armies, a dispirited Robert (Angus Macfadyen) decides to dismiss his men and seek refuge. The bounty on his head proves too much for some and he’s betrayed, badly injured and only just manages to escape with his life. He is rescued and nursed back to health by a young widow (Anna Hutchison) and her family. However, whilst they hide out in a secluded croft of a clan pledged to England, danger closes in.

Whilst Robert the Bruce might be a successor of sorts to Braveheart, it’s an entirely different film. As you’d expect, it’s more self-contained and less epic. This is where the beautiful snow-covered Scottish countryside comes into its own. It provides a stunning backdrop as events unfold. John Garrett’s cinematography ensures that it retains an epic feel whilst the acting allows viewers to connect with the tale. Robert the Bruce is a snowy drama about a pivotal moment in Scottish history.

Robert the Bruce is in cinemas from 28 June.