Atlanta rapper Skinny-C has recently released ‘Never Hungry Always Thirsty Vol. 2: Back For Seconds’, his new album that features Monsta Luther King, Loc Barz, F1Phat, Skolar B, Shod Cooley, and Holly Crew as well as production from Nobody Famous, SMKA, and On A Heist. We fell for his new single MC, which featured Skinny-C rapping only using words that begin with the letters ‘M’ and ‘C’ sequentially. We took the opportunity to speak to him and find out a little more.

I am hip hop. i live hip hop, breathe hip hop, eat hip hop, shit hip hop, love hip hop.

I make music that makes you feel good. All the worries get set aside when listening to my music, which is the goal. Take your mind off of your burdens and get lost in sauce.

The records that got me into music/hip-hop were Too Short, “The Ghetto”. This was the first time I really paid attention to the lyrics. Short was spitting some real life shyt that I would see happen every day right down the street. That hit home for me. The beauty of that song is, it showed that Too Short was a real one, and not just all about pimpin, he came from the gutter and was able to tell his story in a way that everyone can either relate to or imagine. The picture he painted was Picasso vivid.

LL Cool J, “I’m Bad” and “Can’t Live Without My Radio”. I love the energy. I remember as a kid dressing like LL in that video and walking around with a big ass radio reciting every line with as much enthusiasm as he did.

Outkast, Aquemini. Flawless project from beginning to end. No skip tape. Every record is a 12 outta 10. Straight fire. And they’re hometeam…

The best hip-hop record of all time is The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill & Aquemini. Both no skip projects. Even the interludes have meaning.

I started rhyming senior year in high school. Started off as just freestyling in the back of the class, because I was an undercover nerd and what the teachers were teaching I already knew and it bored me. So me and my partner, Slim Dub, started freestyling to kill time. That then led to battle rapping, and then actually writing and recording.

The things that influence my rhymes are
life experiences. whether good or bad, happy or sad. I write about what I have been through or plan to experience in the future.

I wanted to sound like
no one. You can’t stand out trying to fit in. I remain to stay myself, which is unique itself.

My first battle was at Georgia Southern University. This was when 106 & Park was popping and they came to the campus. I battled someone on top of a hummer in front of a crowd of about 200 people. And yes, I won.

I work by the mood I’m in. Forcing something can be recognized through the delivery, so I stay away from that. It all depends on the atmosphere, the surrounding vibes, my process revolves around the current feeling.

My new record is The Commencement

Lyrically, it’s about new beginnings. Walking out of the last chapter and entering a new one. Just like graduating, prior to the ceremony there is a commencement in which you reflect on what has been accomplished and you now focus in on what’s ahead.

On the record I’ve worked with
Nobody Famous. That’s it as far as production. And I have one feature, Carlitta Durand, an amazing singer from NC.

The messages in my rhymes are
heartfelt. Every single bar comes from my soul with deep thought before recording. Each record has a different message, so as far as the content goes, it varies, but the message will remain heartfelt.

In the future I want to
be somewhat of an A&R; discover new talent and help to mold them into being a polished artist.

I’d love to work withDr Dre, Timbaland, Ceelo, Outkast, Snoop Dogg.