Britain, like most countries which have a border with the sea, is surrounded by small (often remote) islands. Many of these are either uninhabited or populated by sparse communities which are often extremely close and inward-facing. Whilst these isolated outcrops can be difficult to reach, they provide atmospheric backdrops; full of mysteries and intrigue. Matthew Butler-Hart uses this to full effect in his new film The Isle.

The year is 1846. The place is off the west coast of Scotland. When a heavy storm causes their ship to sink, three survivors (Alex Hassell, Graham Butler and Fisayo Akinade) find themselves enveloped in thick fog as they row to shore. Injured and disorientated, they are rescued by the hospitable Fingal MacLeod (Dickon Tyrrell) and the mirthless Douglas Innis (Conleth Hill). Whilst things seem normal at first it soon becomes apparent that something very strange is going on.

The Isle is an eerie and unnerving drama which uses natural elements to build a tense and claustrophobic chiller. Whilst the actors do a good job, it’s the island itself which is the real star. Menace and mystery seem to lurk around every corner. Butler-Hart takes influences from Greek mythology and mixes them with Scottish folklore to create a gripping and tense supernatural horror.

The Isle is released on DVD and VoD on 22 July.