Our climate stands at a tipping point, perched in the most precarious position it has been in since the last ice age. We now live in a truly global world where everything is connected. The decimation of the rain forests and the melting of the ice caps has dire consequences for everyone, wherever you may live. There’s no escaping this. Action needs to be taken now but the politicians are sat on their hands, more interested in personal power and petty political disputes. Whilst the fate of the planet seems to rest on the shoulders of activists like Greta Thunberg.

In 2018, at the age of fifteen, the Swedish teenager became a household name in every corner of the planet. She began a personal school strike for climate, which has snowballed into a movement that has been adopted by hundreds of thousands of children across the world. In I Am Greta, director Nathan Grossman follows the determined schoolgirl on her journey to try and get her message across to world leaders.

I Am Greta is a slick portrait of a remarkable young woman whose sheer bravery and determination has put the climate crisis in the media spotlight. It’s easy to forget that Greta is just a teenager trying to get on with growing up. These internal pressures are hinted at and documented by Grossman, but it’s not a film which digs too far beneath the surface. I Am Greta profiles the unassuming and unlikely environmental campaigner and shows our politicians for what they are.  

I Am Greta is out in cinemas on 16 October.