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Eureka Entertainment


When Steven Spielberg released Close Encounters of the Third Kind in 1977 he spearheaded a raft of American alien encounter movies which would continue for over a decade. Whilst best known for E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial, Spielberg went on to make family friendly sci-fi films with a saccharine touch such as A.I. Artificial Intelligence and War …

Alex Ross Perry is a name you may not be familiar with but he’s lauded by many film critics as something of a wunderkind. However, his films have not really generated the same reaction at the box office, only getting limited theatrical releases. The Color Wheel and Impolex may not be familiar to most but …

Whilst Robert Altman has built himself a reputation as one of the greatest modern American directors it took a lot of toil and frustration before he got into the film industry. Whilst he’s best known for the likes of Nashville, McCabe & Mrs. Miller, The Player or M.A.S.H, he spent years working in TV and …

Norwegian expressionism may not be at the top of your list when discussing art but it’s likely you’ll have seen at least one of Edvard Munch’s paintings. Indeed, I’d wager that The Scream would be up there with the most well-known paintings. He’s arguably the first Expressionist painter, alongside Gustav Klimt, and had a profound …

Luchino Visconti is undoubtedly one of the greatest Italian film-makers of all time and was in the vanguard of the neorealism movement which swept the country from the mid 1940s for roughly a decade. His first film, Ossessione, is credited as being the first neorealist film. Whilst he’s best known for The Leopard and Death …

Pier Paolo Pasolini’s death was as controversial and murky as much of his life and cinematic output. An outspoken Communist, Pasolini had a singular drive and worldview which lead to him falling foul of the police and the Communist Party. As a film director he continued this path, courting controversy with much of his work. …

Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon was a huge global success and sparked a huge interest in epic Asian fantasy and martial arts films. Primarily, it introduced the world to the wuxia genre, often characterised by gravity-defying action. However, this is not a new phenomena, with films dating back before WWII. The most notable came in the …

Even as far back as 1966 Americans were suffering from the boredom of suburban normality. Whether as a result of a hangover from the war or a general malaise through the burgeoning middle classes, there was a growing shifting of priorities towards material goods and the breaking down of the traditional family unit. John Frankenheimer …

Whilst the rise of the British Empire and European colonialism may have been profitable for rich white men, it certainly was no fun for the natives. Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness paints the picture of the nightmarish side of Africa but for the most part it was a continent raped of its natural resources and …

Medium Cool

Turbulent times often lead to some of the most groundbreaking cinema. 1968 was possibly the most unstable year in post-war American history. The US were on the back foot in Vietnam, and with public anger at boiling point, President Lyndon Johnson resigned during the Primaries. Martin Luther King and Bobby Kennedy were both assassinated, the …