Two of the biggest social problems in the modern world are those of people trafficking and modern slavery. There are networks of criminal gangs who smuggle the innocent across borders in what is now one of the most profitable illegal industries. Whilst much of the recent focus in the news has been concentrated on the migration towards Europe, it’s a major problem all around the world. The border between Nepal and India one of the busiest trafficking routes in the world. Even When I Fall focuses on girls who have been taken to India and forced to work in circuses.

Sheetal and Saraswoti were sent by their parents to India as youngsters. They were tricked into believing that it would give them a better life and that they would send money back for their family. The poverty within Nepal drives this behaviour. They met as teenagers in a Kathmandu hostel after being rescued from their lives of servitude. Now back in Nepal, they’re frustrated by the life choices their illiteracy has left them with. However, one thing they have got is circus skills. Along with other survivors they form Circus Kathmandu, Nepal’s first circus.

Even When I Fall is a powerful documentary about the brave survivors’ determination to succeed in the face of adversity. Directors Kate McLarnon and Sky Neal allow the women to tell their own stories in their own way. They’re bent on educating Nepali families to stop this abhorrent practice and taking their message around the world. Even When I Fall is a fascinating film which shines the light on a cruel trade. It’s a triumph of the human spirit.

Even When I Fall is out in cinemas from 13 April. It is released on VOD on 25 June and DVD on 9 July.