Anthony Weiner was an outspoken and media-friendly Democratic Congressman. He was hugely popular with the electorate and built up a reputation of campaigning hard on behalf of his constituents. His career was brought to an abrupt halt when he was forced to resign his position after a sexting scandal reached the press. Two years later, in 2013, he decided to re-enter the political fray, announcing his intention to stand in the race to win the Democratic nomination to run for New York mayor. Josh Kriegman documents his campaign in Weiner.

Kriegman is given unprecedented access to Anthony Weiner, his wife and Hilary Clinton’s long-time aide and Vice Chairwoman of her current Presidential campaign Huma Abedin, and the rest of his campaign team. Indeed, as he asks the controversial Democrat, why he was given such unrestricted access is beyond comprehension. Weiner himself turns out to be alarmingly live-wire, yet undoubtedly engaging subject. Whilst Abedin seems to regret his decision to run on an almost daily basis.

Unable to escape his past indiscretions, Weiner cuts an increasingly desperate figure. Whilst he undoubtedly has an attractive charismatic pull and seems to be dedicated to helping others, there’s another side to him which becomes more disturbing by the minute. Weiner is a brilliant film which is consistently hilarious, informative and mind-blowing. It’s one of the best documentaries of the past few years and an eye-opening insight into a political campaign.

Weiner is out in cinemas from 8 July.