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Picturehouse Entertainment


Georges and his jacket

There are few, if any, filmmakers working anywhere in the world today who have the inventiveness or singularity of vision of Quentin Dupieux. In a career which spans two decades (so far) the Frenchman has made a number of unlikely gems. His breakthrough came with Rubber, a film about a serial-killing tyre. He has gone …

Anna at work

Regardless of how multicultural western societies claim to be, when it comes to Afro-textured hair there’s usually a need for specialist and expert treatment. You can’t just walk into any old salon and be guaranteed the service you require. This isn’t just the case when it comes to cutting and styling, weaving and relaxing. The …

A planning session

In many ways the more recent history of Sierra Leonne is not so different to that of its neighbours. Its climate and habitat shielded it from conquest until the European colonisers arrived by sea. Perched on the west coast of Africa, several nations established trading posts until eventually the British created the settlement of the …

Whilst Polish cinema has always been surprisingly fertile, it’s witnessing somewhat of a renaissance at the moment. Historically, the likes of Kieślowski, Wajda, Munk and Żuławski have created some of Eastern Europe’s greatest films. Whilst they’re a tough act to follow, there’s a new generation who are once again leading the charge. It’s perhaps Malgorzata …

For many of us, it can often be a struggle to communicate precisely what we’re trying to say. Whether that’s due to a lack of self-confidence, a speech impediment, lacking sufficient vocabulary or something else, it’s always terribly frustrating when you can’t fully vocalise what you’re thinking. Imagine then what it must be like to …

It’s never a good time to be poor, but years of austerity, COVID-19 and Brexit mean that it hasn’t been this bad for a long time. It has become increasingly difficult to find safe and affordable housing in London, but that’s not uncommon for a European capital. Dublin is almost as bad and has similar …

One popular conceit which film-makers love to play with is throwing their main character(s) into a situation and watching them replay a scenario over and over again. Groundhog Day or Happy Death Day are probably the most famous examples, but there have been many variations on a theme. Johannes Nyholm combines this premise with one …

Over the years, Australian cinema has shown time and time again that when it comes to tackling teenage drama and family tragedy it has a fairly unique spin on things. Cate Shortland’s hypnotic debut Somersault and Simon Stone’s incredibly powerful tale of lies and repercussions, The Daughter, are two great examples of this. They’re now …

Whilst Eva Green proves to be consistently popular with viewers, she doesn’t always get the credit she deserves for her acting ability. The French actor is an equally at home in English as French, best known for her eye-catching performances in Penny Dreadful, as Versper Lynd in Casino Royal or hamming it up in a …

Iceland is the most sparsely populated country in Europe. With well under half-a-million inhabitants, the Nordic nation is self-contained in many ways. Boasting volcanoes, mountains, geysers and glaciers, the sub-arctic island is both starkly beautiful and mercilessly unforgiving. Icelandic cinema often reflects this. The likes of Nói albinói, Rams and Of Horses and Men are …