You should never skim through music judging it’s first 30 seconds alone. Let “An Island Keen To Float” be a cautionary lesson for both listeners and writers, myself included.

The latest single from Sheffield quartet Dead Slow Hoot may seem to be going down a meandering, C30 style path of earnest presentation and emotive content. But at its chorus is a sleeping giant of noise that tears into the listener.

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The group have already caught the attention of both BBC Introducing and 6 Music, which is hardly a surprise. It is just the right level of discordance which can straddle both contemporary pop audiences and those slightly more left-field.

Those of us who listen to 6 Music on a frequent basis I term as left-field.

Such a genuine success at crossing over the perilous path of garnering mainstream acceptance and yet allowing itself to be the kind of band you’d state to show off to even the most ardent of independent music fan is an achievement worthy of praise.

The band’s album, No Reunions, is available now. The band are also playing a handful of dates in June.

June 12 – Leeds – Wharf Chambers
June 14 – Sheffield – Foodhall
June 15 – London – Aces and Eights


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