Idle Ross are one of the most exciting things to come out of Sheffield since the Steel City’s own Blades’ promotional push this season. With their brand new track “Sleeptalking”, they prove that they’re just as ready to play with the big boys in the top tier. Previous debut track “Into the Thick of it” (reviewed here) was a “cocky, swaggering, hypnotic three minutes of swirling classic rock guitar riffs and shuffling Kasabian-esque hip hop beats” and “Sleeptalking” is just as bold a statement, fusing rock, funk and pop into a track designed to send everyone shuffling to their nearest indie disco dancefloor.

Channeling the brash 70s guitars of Hendrix, Lou Reed and the Rolling Stones via more recent indie pop sensibilities (Supergrass, the Charlatans) and drum work which makes the listener knackered just trying to keep up with it, Idle Ross have added in a soulful wurlitzer-esque keyboard underpinning which makes the track somehow even funkier than ever. Ross’s vocals are fuzzy and distorted, rendering his intelligently aggressive delivery as though travelling through time itself from a lost Stooges demo and whilst Charlie’s bass and Spen’s riffs are suitably sleazy and outrageous, the song itself, as with most of Idle Ross’ output, is more thoughtful, incisive and damning.

The last minute of all already tight 2:48 is given over to a massive instrumental middle eight freakout of wild guitars and insistent percussion, then a lairy final run through the chorus leaving audiences sweaty and eager for the next track. Judging by their recent gigs alongside Black Grape and Red Rum Club, that next track will also go down a storm.

Idle Ross have played increasingly high profile support slots and their own well-attended headline gigs and kick off the festival season by playing Mosfest on Friday 31st May. Listen to “Into the Thick of it” now on Spotify and look out for the forthcoming release of “Sleeptalking” a live date near you. Check out the boys on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Read my accompanying interview with lead singer Ross Green here.