It seems almost unbelievable in this day and age that race relations in America have regressed towards the levels they were during the Civil Rights movement. Some of the gains Martin Luther King et al made have gradually been eroded under the current regime. Most worryingly, the spectre of white nationalism is on the rise, finding a new home under the Trump regime. Carlos López Estrada’s latest film Blindspotting is a timely reminder of what it’s like to be young, black, male and American.

Collin (Daveed Diggs) only has three days of probation left and is desperately trying to stay out of trouble. One of the major barriers in him achieving this goal is his best friend. Miles (Rafael Casal) is erratic, unpredictable and liable to lose his cool at any moment. They both work for a removals company in Oakland. One day, Collin witnesses a white police officer (Ethan Embry) shoot and kill an unarmed black man. This event traumatises him, haunting every moment of his life.

Blindspotting is a timely film about the state of America. Estrada has created a powerful drama which goes some way to providing the viewer with an experience of what it is like to be in Collin’s shoes. Diggs is exceptional as a man desperately trying to build a life for himself; delivering one particularly moving monologue in particular with such gusto. Whilst it makes a series of important observations, Blindspotting occasionally crosses the line into diatribe. However, It’s a compelling piece of social commentary and a felicitous reminder of the world we’re now living in.

Blindspotting is released on Digital Download by Lionsgate Home Entertainment on 28 January and DVD & Blu-ray on 4 February.