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The Cult


Not Forgotten: The Cult – Dreamtime

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Classic Compilation: The Cult – Pure Cult: For Rockers, Ravers, Lovers and Sinners

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Not Forgotten: The Cult – Sonic Temple

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By early 1983 Bradford’s goth rockers Southern Death Cult had called it a day, having released a solitary single. An album consisting of said single, as well as a bunch of radio sessions and live recordings was released after their split, however by that time frontman Ian Astbury had already started to lay the foundations …

Two years before the 1989 release of ‘Sonic Temple’, The Cult shocked many of their goth-tinged indie followers with the release of ‘Electric’, a hard rock-infused blast of an album that subverted many of the indie rock tropes. Introducing distorted riffs, wild guitar solos and posturing more befitting a heavy metal devil-worshiping rock band, this …

The Cult always seemed to be a bit of an oddity in the British landscape of music in the 80s. They weren’t a miserable indie band, they were briefly goths, they were musically opposed to synth-pop, and they weren’t a flag-waving celtic rock act either. The Cult’s transition from goth rockers to a straight ahead …

Sonic Temple came at an interesting point in The Cult’s career. Having evolved from paisley-patterned goths, 1987’s Electric had seen them strip back their sound to brutal and basic biker-booted hard rock riffery. Having originally attracted as a post-punk act, going full on hard rock was an interesting evolutionary move, but one that had seen …

The Cult at Leeds Uni. I can remember saying that a few times in the past. Despite their flit to the states, world wide stadium shows and all that other razzamatazz, it still feels right and proper to me, that the one and only place to truly experience such an iconic band is right on …

February see’s The Cult, one of Britain’s most influential rock bands, return with their 10th studio album “Hidden City” and a nationwide 10 date tour. Originally starting out as The Southern Death Cult in 1981, Ian Astbury and co. were at the forefront of a new scene and helped pave a way for gothic rock to …

The Cult, bless their ridiculous hairstyles, couldn’t have found it easy to follow-up their unexpectedly successful album Love, particularly as it had included one of the key rock songs of the decade, “She Sells Sanctuary”. Although they apparently attempted to make a bigger and better version of their previous album, The Cult got bogged down …