Editor's Rating

Turbo Kid is a brilliantly offbeat rollercoaster ride of fun, which channels the original Mad Max through a multi-coloured lens.

8

The year 1997. The apocalypse has already happened and those left struggle to survive in a harsh climate where commerce and existence is dominated by the ownership of water. It’s a premise which shares certain similarities with the original Mad Max film, and François Simard and Anouk Whissell, the directors of Turbo Kid, pay homage to George Miller’s film. However, Turbo Kid is drenched in the kaleidoscopic hues of the ’80s.

The Kid (Munro Chambers) lives alone in the ‘safe zone’. He’s a comic obsessive and an avid collector of the remnants of the pre-apocalyptic world. Using his bike for scavenging missions, his life is set into a rhythm. That is until the mysterious and colourful Apple (Laurence Leboeuf) arrives on the scene. In a world ruled by the nefarious Zeus (Michael Ironside), they must band together with the mysterious Frederic The Arm-Wrestler (Aaron Jeffery) to keep themselves alive.

Turbo Kid is pure delight for those of us with fond memories of the offbeat kitsch of the ’80s. It’s by far and away the brightest and lustrous post apocalyptic film you’re ever likely to see. There’s also a tenderness in amongst the comical bloodshed. It’s an essentially sweet film set in a world of brutality and pain. Turbo Kid is a brilliantly offbeat rollercoaster ride of fun. I have no idea why anyone would decide to make a film like this, but I for one am eternally grateful they did.

You can check Turbo Kid out at this year’s Frightfest and a full theatrical release will hopefully follow.