Two Skies will release their new EP When the Storm Hits on 15th April. The release will come via Sister 9 Recordings and will be the bands sixth release.

Formed in Sheffield, Two Skies were driven together by a mutual love of ethereal noises and powerful trippy groves. Their laden grooves are influenced by late night jamming sessions and the surrealistic world of David Lynch and thus their music is a heady mixtures of rollicking bass lines and fuzzy guitar vibes. Often coming in contrast to the surf feel psych that is becoming more and more to the foreground, Two Skies cling firmly to the dark – which is fitting as this EP was recorded by candlelight in the bands own studio.

The four track offering opens with title track ‘When the Storm Hits’, a four minute track which immediately affronts the vocal prowess of Dan Cutts. The track rolls as it progresses almost with an air of caution before the central rise falls like the crest of a wave. The mood is sombre and provocative and it’s a pleasant introduction to the EP, for fans and new acquaintances alike. Next up we have the sufficiently oddly named and yet highly interesting ‘Drone Attack NP 19’ which intrigues with its swirling guitar courtesy of Dan accompanied by the persistence of the drumming from Oliver Harrap. The track progresses into a number that would sit up there with the best of any of the space rock greats with the vocals adding a pleasing aural interlude to the weight of the track. The end of the track is where this one makes it mark as it builds to a cacophony of intensity.

‘Arrows’ offers a probing bass line courtesy of Jamie Cheetham and overall minor key gives the upbeat track a dark edge just simmering below the surface. This is the most musically complex track on the album and really shows their skills as a band. The elements blend perfectly indicating here with have a band who understands the intricacies of their own skill set. Concluding the album we have ‘Hypnotist’, a song recently released on the Blak Rainbow compilation cassette via Blak Hand Records. The lyrics catch the attention within this one, adding another weapon to the Two Skies arsenal. It rounds of the collection succinctly, with just enough to please the listener, but not quite enough to leave them satisfied.

Two Skies have gone from strength to strength in their short history and are certainly a band to be watched within the ‘psych’ genre; although to put them within that category is almost unfair as they really are so much more than that and those adverse to this epithet should not be put off by it.