That wave of ’80’s influenced “indie” has yet to subside as of yet, believe it or not. I’m not disparaging it by any means but I am sure we can all be honest when we say it has stuck.

And they said that decade was awful. At least millennials seem to think that is the case. A decade of consumerism juxtaposed with earnestness.

Earnest is a good way to describe “After Forever”, by Leeds quartet Heir. Unabashedly pop-centric, the group are in the middle of a European tour having found initial success by virtue of solid Spotify numbers. Could I make references to Tears for Fears and a raft of other off-kilter pop groups at the time (Fiction Factory, Hall and Oates, Blancmange)? I certainly could.

These are names however that modern listeners hold in positive esteem, it’s important to remind you (or mention.) Rather than the hokey excesses of 1980’s dance floor tear jerkers/emotive moments of self-reflection (many of the time found on a John Hughes’ soundtrack), Heir draws influence from the double-take provocativeness of those more cult icons of the music scene.

“Wait… did they just say that? I was too wrapped up in how soothing the melodies are.” Or thoughts to that extent.

Take a listen for yourself.

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Heir are currently on tour across Europe, while the band’s staunch DIY ethos has lead them to launch their own collaborative arts night, Blueprint, that takes place in Leeds.